Eye Clinic
Eye Clinic

The GIH Eye Clinic is a full service state of the art ophthalmic practice, which has served in Uganda since 2004. Our physicians are leaders in eye care education. They are dedicated to staying on the cutting edge of eye care technology. GIH Eye Clinic specialises in the latest eye care technology and treatment for eye conditions such as:

The Human Eye

The eye collects visual information and transmits it to the brain for processing. Essentially, the human eye looks and the brain tells us what we are looking at. The lens and cornea help focus the light on the part of the retina called macula. The iris assists the cornea and lens in focusing light, but also controls the amount of light entering the eye. The retina converts the information to signals that are carried to the brain by the optic nerve for processing. When all the components are working properly we enjoy sight.

How we see

Seeing can be likened to the process of taking pictures on a film with a camera which you then get developed. The retina is like a camera film which stores an image of what we are looking at. The image directed onto the retina is then sent along to the brain where it is processed, like developing a camera film. Therefore we actually “see” in our brain with the light information sent to it from our eyes. This whole process happens very quickly so that everything we see is in focus. Two common sight conditions are myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness). Nearsighted people have trouble seeing things a distance. The medical term for nearsightedness is myopia. It is due to the long shape of their eye. This shape means the light does not focus on the macula as it should. This problem can be corrected by glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery. Farsightedness people have trouble seeing thing close up. The medical term for farsightedness is hyperopia. This problem is caused by a shorter eye and can be corrected by glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery.

Cataract Surgery

Cataracts are common in older people. About 60 percent of those older than 60 years and 70 percent of those older than 75 years have cataracts. Because cataracts can seriously impair your vision, they can limit or prevent you from working or enjoying many of the activities that are important to the quality of your life. Fortunately, medical science has made significant strides in cataract treatment. Today, the vast majority of patients whose cataracts are treated surgically enjoy vision that is at least as good as the vision they had before they developed cataracts.

Refractive Lens Exchange

Refractive Lens Exchange can also be referred to as Clear Lens Exchange. The eyes’ natural lens is replaced with an artificial (intraocular) implant. The lens of the eye is used to reflect and focus light rays onto the retina, which ultimately allow you to see. Cataracts form in the natural lens of the eye resulting in blurred vision over time. Patient’s who choose to undergo a CLE will eliminate the possibility of cataracts forming at a later date and enjoy clear, crisp vision. If you have early cataracts, you could choose to have a CLE instead of waiting for the cataracts to advance enough to require cataract surgery. Artificial (intraocular) lenses likely can provide significantly better uncorrected vision at that point, especially if you now require vision correction with glasses or contact lenses. This procedure is considered elective surgery, meaning that it is not covered by health insurance. CLE can sometimes be a great alternative for patients who have been told they are not candidates for LASIK surgery. When a traditional implant is used for a CLE the distance vision is dramatically improved and the dependency of glasses for full time usage is greatly reduced and in some cases completely eliminated. Patients will usually require correction for near tasks (reading) and intermediate tasks (computer). In addition, monovision can be used with CLE to allow distance vision and reading without glasses. The technique used for CLE has been performed for decades on cataract patients with superb results.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve and result in vision loss and blindness. The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibre’s. It connects the retina to the brain. The retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. A healthy optic nerve is necessary for good vision. In the front of the eye is a space called the anterior chamber. A clear fluid flows continuously in and out of the chamber and nourishes nearby tissues. The fluid leaves the chamber at the open angle where the cornea and iris meet. When the fluid reaches the angle, it flows through a spongy meshwork, like a drain, and leaves the eye. Sometimes, when the fluid reaches the angle, it passes too slowly through the meshwork drain. As the fluid builds up, the pressure inside the eye rises to a level that may damage the optic nerve. When the optic nerve is damaged from increased pressure, open-angle glaucoma–and vision loss–may result. That’s why controlling pressure inside the eye is important. Increased eye pressure means you are at risk for glaucoma, but does not mean you have the disease. A person has glaucoma only if the optic nerve is damaged. If you have increased eye pressure but no damage to the optic nerve, you do not have glaucoma. However, you are at risk.

Who is at Risk?

Anyone can develop glaucoma. Some people are at higher risk than others. They include: *People over the age of 40 Immediate treatment for early stage, open-angle glaucoma can delay progression of the disease. That’s why early diagnosis is very important. A comprehensive dilated eye exam by one of GIH Eye Clinic’s eye care professionals can reveal more risk factors, such as high eye pressure, thinness of the cornea, and abnormal optic nerve anatomy. In some people with certain combinations of these high-risk factors, medicines in the form of eye drops reduce the risk of developing glaucoma by about half.

RTA MACHINE

The RTA is an innovative and unique diagnostic instrument that is used to process the health of the retina. The retina is tissue in the back of the eye that is responsible for collecting data and transmitting it to your brain for processing. A specialized laser scans and measures the retina. These measurements are then analyzed by a computer and used to create a map of the retina. The RTA scans the retina and optic nerve with a laser, The RTA is able to process information and measurements taken from the retina, macula, optic nerve and all surrounding retinal tissue. Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Diabetes are all diseases that can be monitored with the RTA.

Visual Analyser Machine

The VA is an innovative and unique diagnostic instrument that is used to process the health of the retina. The retina is tissue in the back of the eye that is responsible for collecting data and transmitting it to your brain for processing. A specialized laser scans and measures the retina. These measurements are then analyzed by a computer and used to create a map of the retina. The VA scans the retina and optic nerve with a laser, The VA is able to process information and measurements taken from the retina, macula, optic nerve and all surrounding retinal tissue. Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Diabetes are all diseases that can be monitored with the VA.

DIABETIC EYE CARE

If you have diabetes, you should have your eyes examined at least once a year at the GIH Eye Clinic. It is possible that you could develop a disease is called Diabetic Retinopathy. This disease is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, retinal blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These changes may result in vision loss or blindness. Often there are no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. Vision may not change until the disease becomes severe. Nor is there any pain. Blurred vision may occur when the macula – the part of the retina that provides sharp, central vision – swells from the leaking fluid. This condition is called macular edema. If new vessels have grown on the surface of the retina, they can bleed into the eye, blocking vision. But, even in more advanced cases, the disease may progress a long way without symptoms. That is why regular eye examinations for people with diabetes are so important.

Early Detection

Finding and treating the disease early, before it causes vision loss or blindness, is the best way to control diabetic eye disease. So, if you have diabetes, make sure you get a dilated eye examination at least once a year. Your eyes will be dilated during the exam. That means eyedrops are used to enlarge your pupils. This allows our eye care professionals to see more of the inside of your eyes to check for signs of the disease. If you should have diabetic retinopathy laser surgery and appropriate follow-up care can reduce the risk of blindness by 90 percent. However, laser surgery often cannot restore vision that has already been lost. That is why finding diabetic retinopathy early is the best way to prevent vision loss.

Intacs

Intacs prescription inserts provide a unique new option to improve a patient’s vision and possibly defer a corneal transplant. Intacs are indicated for the correction of nearsightedness and astigmatism for patients with keratoconus, where contact lenses and glasses no longer provide suitable vision. For those keratoconic patients who are contact lens intolerant, Intacs prescription inserts offer a less threatening option than a corneal transplant. Most physicians would prefer to delay a corneal transplant – to make it the option of last resort. Intacs prescription inserts make this a possibility by improving functional vision, and possible delaying the need for a corneal transplant. The goal of the Intacs procedure is to provide the keratoconic patient with the ability to achieve improved functional vision with contact lenses or glasses in some cases without them. In the patients who later had a corneal transplant after having the Intacs procedure, their transplants were completed without any complications. Talk to your physician today to see if Intacs are right for you.

MACULAR DEGENERATION

Macular degeneration affects 25 million Africans, primarily older adult Caucasians, and is the leading cause of visual impairment in this population. Macular Degeneration is the breakdown of the macula of the eye which is the area of the eye responsible for central vision. Though it does not leads to total blindness since peripheral vision remains intact; it does destroy reading and driving vision to the point which these activities are not possible for most people with the condition. There are two common types of macular degeneration, “dry” and “wet”, with dry being the most common. In dry macular degeneration the loss of vision is usually gradual and is caused by thinning of the tissues of the macula related to aging. There is a great deal of debate concerning the role of nutrition and nutritional supplements in slowing the progression of this form of macular degeneration. A great deal of attention centers on the role of lutein and anti-oxidants in slowing the progression of the dry form of macular degeneration. Wet macular degeneration is less common but may lead to a more rapid loss of vision. This form of macular degeneration is caused by the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the retina, which leaks fluid or blood. Dry macular degeneration can lead to wet macular degeneration rather quickly.